Research

Developing Inclusive Youth (DIY)

DIY is a school-based program designed to promote intergroup friendships and reduce prejudice and bias in childhood. The program involves a web-based curriculum tool, DIY, which is an animated, voice-over tool that depicts social exclusion scenarios which involve participants’ decisions, evaluations, and attributions of emotions. A Teaching Inclusive Youth (TIY) component is also part of the program.  Currently, the program is being evaluated with a randomized control trial (RCT) to test its effectiveness, funded by NSF and NIH.

Resource allocation decisions in the context of social inequalities. 

Series of studies investigating children’s and adolescents’ decisions and reasoning about the allocation of limited resources on the basis of group disadvantaged status, with a focus on economic inequalities.

Gender stereotypes, resource allocation, and intergroup contact. 

Young children’s developing conceptions of merit-based fairness, roles of intergroup contact and gender stereotypes in allocation decisions and reasoning.

Resource allocation and theory of mind. 

How first and second order theory of mind relate to children’s judgments, reasoning, and decisions regarding resource allocation.

Social inclusion and exclusion in peer contexts: The role of race and wealth status.  

Children’s and adolescents’ evaluations of group inclusion and exclusion decisions on the basis of race and wealth status in peer contexts.

Claims to resources and mental state knowledge. 

Children’s recognition of the roles of resource type and intentionality of recipient claims when allocating resources.

Children’s expectation about friendship and status:

How children reason about friendship between peers of different social status in terms of wealth and popularity.

Moral reasoning about wealth inequalities in young adults.

How individual and structural sources of wealth are related to conceptions about wealth inequalities, acquisition of wealth, wealth constancy,  and societal concepts of fairness.

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